The basics of bike setup with Nina

Setting up a bike for it’s rider is a funny thing. If just one element is out of place it could disrupt your entire ride. If it’s done right, the bike will just feel right.

After three seasons of being on Team Arbutus, the crew at the shop are constantly working to keep both my small SB5 and myself rolling smooth through races and epic adventures. I want to take you behind the hard work to see just what my bike cockpit looks like, new for 2017:

Stem:

New this year, the stem I’m rocking on my Yeti is a 35mm Deity Copperhead. For bike sizing, I opt for a bigger size frame with a short stem, resulting in a longer bike than typical for my height. That way the bike has bad-ass stability when terrain gets steep and loose (aka most of my favourite trails in the Sea to Sky area).

Bars:

Another new element to my ride this year are the Signature Tracy Moseley bars from Deity (aka the T-Mo Carbon 760). Because of my height and wingspan I have the bars trimmed down to a comfortable 740mm.

Saddle:

I’ve opted for the Yeti edition WTB Deva saddle, designed for the Beti by WTB. I’m a huge fan of the shorter and wider profile of this saddle. I spend a lot of time sitting here so it’s important to have a comfortable fit.

Suspension:

Arbutus is known for their crazy wonderful precision when it comes to setting up suspension. Whenever I get a new ride I head in for a session with the mechanics to get my shock dialled in. The fork I’m running is a Fox 34 FIT-4. The rear shock is a Fox Float DPS Factory. I have my sag % setup slightly uneven, so it feels perfect when I’m on the steeps (where it counts). Optimal sag for me? 30% in the rear shock and 25% in the front. Cool specs details are listed on the Yeti Cycles site.

Have questions about your bike fit or suspension? Just pop by the shop and ask the mechanics. They’re a friendly bunch and certainly know their way around two wheels.

See you out on the trails!
Nina Arnold, Team Arbutus Rider